Kodi in turmoil as Netflix, Amazon, Sky and Warner Brothers join forces and a major online library Kodi’s add-on community has mysteriously disappeared

A major Kodi “add-on” which supplied a library of pirated sports, box-office films and TV shows has mysteriously disappeared.

The library, called TV Addons, is being sued in an American court, but it appeared to vanish this week.

It was one of the most popular Kodi stream suppliers, but pirates will no doubt find other sources to stream videos.

Telly giants ramped up their campaign to stop hundreds of thousands of Brits accessing copyrighted material using their PCs or a Kodi set-top box which connects to their TV sets.

Netflix, Amazon, Sky, Sony and Warner Brothers have joined together to form a group called ACE, the Alliance for Creativity and Entertainment, which brings together the biggest names in global media.

Andrew Griffith, Group Chief Operating Officer at Sky has issued the following comment: “We welcome the launch of ACE. Collaboration is critical in tackling this important issue – piracy is illegal, unreliable, and risky for consumers.”

They will fight for targeted criminal and civil enforcement actions on behalf of their members.

ACE’s website states that it “supports cooperation with law enforcement agencies around the world to advance these measures and address theft of creative works”.

While ACE isn’t specifically targeting the average Brit, and are going after large-scale cyber criminals, the UK’s copyright protection board, FACT, said it’s just a matter of time before someone is caught in the crackdown on people selling “fully loaded” Kodi boxes online.

That’s because, after raiding sellers, records of their customers will form part of a wider probe.

FACT chief executive Kieron Sharp previously told The Sun Online: “If you consider it like a criminal selling stolen jewellery, the people who are buying these goods, how much they bought them for and where they will all form a part of the investigation,”

A law has just been passed which has upped sentences for people infringing copyright – and those making money from it (including businesses who advertise on streaming sites and website and hardware sellers which sell access to pirated material like sports and box office films).

They now face up to ten years in jail – but those who buy boxes could be put behind bars too.

Sharp revealed: “This won’t affect the everyday person. But someone caught with a lot of material could still be affected, although it might be a very short sentence or a suspended one.”

Customers who bought Kodi Boxes from street-sellers are unlikely to get caught, but if you’ve bought one online there could be a digital trail leading to your door.